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    Lead Dangers are Everywhere

    Lead is a naturally occurring metal that is harmful if inhaled or swallowed. Lead can be found in air, soil, dust, glazed pottery, toys, food, candy and water via the plumbing fixtures and piping.

    How can I be exposed to lead?

    The most common source of lead exposure is from paint in homes and buildings built before 1978.  Adults and children can be exposed to lead from various sources, such as paint, gasoline, solder and consumer products and through different pathways, such as air, food, water, dust and soil. Although there are several exposure sources, the main sources of exposure to lead are ingesting paint chips and inhaling dust. The dust is so small you cannot see it. Most children get lead poisoning when they breathe or swallow the dust on their hands and toys.

    Why is lead a health issue?

    Lead can be harmful. It can impact normal physical and mental development in babies and young children. Lead can cause deficits in the attention span, hearing and learning abilities of children. Lead can increase blood pressure in adults. Most children who have lead poisoning do not look or act sick.

    What are the risks of lead exposure?

    Lead can cause a variety of adverse health effects when people are exposed to it. These effects may include increases in the blood pressure of some adults; delays in normal physical and mental development in babies and young children; and deficits in the attention span, hearing and learning abilities of children.

     

    How do I keep my children away from lead paint and dust?

    Use wet paper towels to clean up lead dust. Be sure to clean around windows, play areas and floors. Wash hands and toys often, especially before eating and sleeping. Use soap and water. Use contact paper or duct tape to cover chipping or peeling paint.

     

    More information can be found on the CDC Lead website.

     

    Additional information has been provided by our partners at the

    Fort Worth Water Department:

    Tips for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water

    Tips for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water (Spanish)

    How to Identify Lead Plumbing

    Sources of lead in and around the home

     

     

    Early Symptoms of Lead Poisoning